Avoid the Time-Suck: Market on Facebook without Wasting Time

Save Time - Avoid the Time-Suck of FacebookThere’s no doubt about it, Facebook can be a real time suck, if you don’t use it wisely. But believe it or not, if you take the time to PLAN now, you’re going to save a lot of time later.

Taking the time in advance to define your audience, organize your information, create a publication calendar, as well as brainstorming and creating content along with the judicious use of management tools will go far in being more efficient AND will help you get better results.

#1: Define Your Audience – Know who you’re sharing with so that it’s easier to know how to phrase your updates, as well as to know what updates will be important to your fans. If you know your audience well you’ll avoid waiting your time and theirs will irrelevant posts.

#2: Create a Publication Calendar – You can use Google Calendar as your publication calendar. Simply create a new calendar called Facebook Calendar or whatever you want to call it and create an entry each day for the types of content you want to post. If you click edit, you can check the box to repeat entry.

#3: Brainstorm Content – Know exactly what type of content you want to create to share on Facebook in advance. Everything you share should have a purpose of some kind. Don’t just share things for no reason. Knowing in advance what you’ll share and why you’ll share it is a time saver because it keeps you from wasting time sharing content without a purpose.

#4: Create Content – Whenever you sit down to create content, do so in batches. Creating several blog posts about the same topic at once is faster. You only have to research once, then start writing based on that research. Your mind will get into the flow of writing. Then you can schedule the posts in WordPress easily. Next, either grab the links to share on Facebook manually (using Facebook’s schedule feature or another third party app scheduling feature), or using another app to share automatically with Facebook like NetworkedBlogs to speed up the process will help you work faster. Do be cautious about too much automation without a comment by yourself on each shared piece of content.

#5: Get Organized – The content you want to share should be inside a spreadsheet with links ready to grab. These can also be uploaded to Google Drive. When you create a new blog post, or new content, or find content on the web that you want to share, grab the link immediately and stick into your spreadsheet for sharing during your 10 minutes.

#6: Use Third Party Apps – Apps like the cloud-based MarketMeSuite , Hootsuite Pro, and others can help you automate your social media marketing strategy in a simple way. You can manage all of your social media for Facebook from one inbox. Messages can be scheduled in advance and appear without any type of branding or appearance of scheduling from a 3rd party app in some cases. Be cautious about using too much automation especially if the program announces it came from a third party app.

#7: Use Facebook Features – Use any feature Facebook already offers. One of the features Facebook already offers business pages is the ability to schedule posts. When you start to create an update just click on the little clock, then pick the year, month, day that you want your update to appear on your time line.

#8: Hire a Virtual Assistant – Hiring a contractor to help you with social media like Facebook is a great way to help create more time for engaging with others. Only you can truly engage with your audience, but anyone can post the planned updates and content to your Facebook page. If you outsource the things that don’t require personal attention, you can then focus only on what does require personal attention.

Using Facebook to promote your business only needs to take ten minutes per day if you have everything planned out in advance, entered into a calendar and transferred to your “to do” list. Get started now with daily Facebook activity that will increase awareness, traffic and sales…and it should only take you about 10 minutes a day to get done.

 

Free Downloadable / Printable Goals Journal

Free Downloadable Goals JournalIf you need a little guidance and encouragement to reach your goals, whether it’s for your writing, your business or even a personal goal, here’s a printable journal that might come in handy.

This journal walks you through:

  • The process of using a journal to achieve your goals
  • Understanding the WHY of your goal
  • Setting a S.M.A.R.T. goal
  • Self-assessment to get you to success faster
  • Overcoming obstacles
  • Gathering your tools and research
  • Planning for success

…and more with plenty of space to chart your progress and thoughts.

Click here to download your free printable journal (PDF)

P.S. If you’d like to publish your own journals just like this and them with your customers, Alice has done much of the work for you and you’ll save tons of time. Click here to get her complete done-for-you package of journals that you can share, sell and more.

Have Enough Content for a Book?

Here’s a question that almost every aspiring author asks themselves. Heck, even repeat authors wonder this as well.

Talk to most folks and they’ll tell you that they have a great idea for a book. And to be fair, any good book starts with an idea. However, an idea isn’t enough.

Sure, when Robert Kiyosaki dreamed up his Rich Dad, Poor Dad book, it probably started as just a simple idea on how to teach people about money. But that, of course, isn’t enough for a book.

So how do you know you have enough information for a full book? Let’s take a look at how to transform a book idea into a published piece.

Do You Have the Information, Experience, and Knowledge to Write This Book?

Ideas come from all sorts of places. You might imagine writing a book about decorating your home or rebuilding a car. If you don’t have any experience or knowledge in either of those worlds, there will be a lot of extra work to do. That’s okay. It’s not the end of your book idea.

However, it’s important to be realistic about your starting point. It may take more time and resources to create your ready-to-publish book.

What’s the Hook? <<<—– This is KEY!

Why will people want to read your book? How is it different, interesting, and entertaining? What makes your information something that readers will value and want to buy? This may be the most difficult question to answer, because audiences are fickle. However, you need to have some idea before you start writing. If you’re not sure why it will be a good book, keep thinking about it until you know.

How Will You Write It?

A better way to ask this question is, “How much planning will you do before you begin to write?”

Here are some points to consider: 

* Do you have the ideas solidly in your mind so they remain consistent throughout?
* Do you know how your book will provide value?
* What is the USP or Unique Selling Point?
* What’s the goal for writing a book? What do you hope to achieve?
* Who is your audience and what information will they value?

Some writers know every detail before they sit down and begin to write their book. Others have a sketchy idea in their mind, or on paper, and they use that as a starting point. Some people write chapters as they come to them and then weave them together. Others create an elaborate outline and work from their storyboard or plan.

There’s no right or wrong way to approach your book idea. However, it is a good idea to think about how you want to approach it before you sit down to write. Don’t be surprised if you cannot see your entire book plan all at once. That’s okay. Plan what you can and go from there.

Second drafts and revisions are where you’ll pull it all together. For now, start planning and begin writing. Don’t lose that great book idea!

Are you planning to write a book? Let us know if this helps you get closer to getting it done.

Do This Next, If You Want to Make a Better Living from Writing

WriterHelpWanted.com and EliteWritersLab.com co-founders, Ron Douglas and Alice Seba, recently got together to discuss the 5 obstacles that keep most writer from earning a good living from their writing.

Inside this free video, you’ll learn about the 5 obstacles that keep most writers from earning a full-time living from their skills. If you ever procrastinate, doubt your skills or just aren’t sure how you can get started, this is for you.
To receive free instant accessjust click here to get started.

9 Ways Short Stories Can Earn You Money

Short stories can help you earn money in a number of way. The digital age has created a new interest in short, sharp fiction, as the internet generation looks for “snackable”, entertaining content to help pass the time when they are waiting for the bus and so on.

1. Building Your Name and Brand

Smartphones and tablets have changed the way we consume content. So has blogging. If you want to get your name in front of an eager audience, write briefly and consistently and you should soon develop a fan base.

In addition to your blog or site, try other prominent short story sharing sites. Wattpad allows all users to upload their stories and for others to read them for free. Readwave shares “3-minute stories” written by users. Both sites can get you noticed quickly.

If you ever do decide to try to work with a traditional publisher, they will ask about your marketing ideas. A built-in fan base could be just what you need to tip the scales in your favor if you want to sell your novel.

2. Getting Paid Directly

You can publish your work on Amazon through the Kindle Singles program and get paid for your work regularly. Amazon also offers a Short Reads section in which customers can choose content by genre and word count/time it takes to read. They’ve also created Day One Magazine to showcase short fiction from new authors. Tell your fan base your work is on sale and you could be one of Amazon’s top writers in no time.

3. Anthologies Have Become Popular

The Chicken Soup for the Soul series of books confused publishers at first, but now it is a tried-and-tested business model. Anthologies are easy to create, cheap and can get your name noticed – especially if there are some top writers in your genre contributing. In many cases, the profits will be donated to charity, but you can gain a great deal of prestige. Check out Writer’s Digest and Writer’s Relief to find requests for submissions.

4. Published Is Published

It doesn’t matter if it is only a short story. If you are accepted and printed online or on paper, you are a published author.

5. Contests Can Be Profitable

Entering contests with cash prizes can help you earn money as an author, provided the entry fees are not too high and the contest is a reputable one.

6. Contests Can Add to Your Resume

Winning a prize in a well-known contest can help establish your credibility as a professional writer.

7. Short Stories Are Quick, Easy and Fun

They can help keep your interested in writing when things might otherwise seem like a lot of hard work. If you’re suffering from writer’s block on your novel, look for a contest with a stimulating topic and write a great short story for it.

8. Movie Makers Are Always Looking for Good Content

Around 70% of films come from fiction that inspires a director or producer. Short stories with strong characters and a gripping twist in the tale are ideal.

9. Short Stories Build Your List

Your author list at Amazon will grow, and with it, your visibility as a writer worth paying attention to.

Do This Next, If You Want to Make a Better Living from Writing

WriterHelpWanted.com and EliteWritersLab.com co-founders, Ron Douglas and Alice Seba, recently got together to discuss the 5 obstacles that keep most writer from earning a good living from their writing.

Inside this free video, you’ll learn about the 5 obstacles that keep most writers from earning a full-time living from their skills. If you ever procrastinate, doubt your skills or just aren’t sure how you can get started, this is for you.
To receive free instant accessjust click here to get started.

Useful Writing Resources to Help You Achieve Success

There are many resources dedicated to the art of writing and becoming a successful writer. And the number online is growing all the time. Here are some of the best:

  1. Writer Help Wanted (sure, we’re biased)

Whether you’re brand new or looking to amp up your efforts to earn a living from writing, this resources has you covered. It’s perfect if you want to freelance, sell information products, write books or use your writing talents in new and creative ways.

2. Writer’s Market

This is the a great writing resource, for a number of reasons. It gives hints, tips and practical advice on all aspects of being a writer, from starting your first work to what to do once you have been published. It lists paying markets where you can start earning money as a writer. It also breaks down the information into specific types of writing, such as:

* Children’s writing
* Poetry
* Blogging
* Short stories

And more.

In addition, it lists contests, calls for writers, and the latest information on literary agents. Twilight series author Stephenie Meyer got her start from all she learned subscribing to Writer’s Market. Make the most of all the free information at the site and then decide if one or more of their subscriptions is right for you.

3. Writer’s Digest

This is another packed website no writer can live without. It is packed with articles, writers’ challenges, contests, genre-specific advice, and editors’ blogs that can give you real insights on how to break into the world of publishing.

4. Aerogramme Writers’ Studio

This site lists contests, writing opportunities and more – all free.

5. Bartleby

Bartleby is like a writer’s reference shelf all in one place, with digital versions of classics, grammar books and more. If you’re looking for quotations, inspiration, a dictionary, thesaurus and so on, this is the site for you.

6. Diy MFA

The Do-It-Yourself Master of Fine Arts site tries to help you do just that – learn how to be a writer without having to go back to college. It is packed with ideas, hints and tips. It also has a really fun “Writer Igniter” that gives you a random character, situation, prop and setting to help get your creative juices flowing (http://diymfa.com/writer-igniter). Just use the situations given and start writing, or hit the “shuffle” button to get other prompts.

7. Every Writer

This is a rather sprawling online magazine packed with writing hints and tips for every genre. It also has a useful list of writers’ organizations that can help propel your career forward.

8. Quick and Dirty Tips – Grammar Girl 

Hated grammar at school? Not to worry. Grammar Girl makes it a lot more accessible at this interesting site.

9. Scribendi

This is the site for all things related to editing and proof-reading. Use the free resources, or explore their paid services to make sure your manuscript is the best can be.

10. Writer’s Relief

For the past 23 years, this site has been helping authors get published. Check out free articles, listings and more, or use their affordable services.

Do This Next, If You Want to Make a Better Living from Writing

WriterHelpWanted.com and EliteWritersLab.com co-founders, Ron Douglas and Alice Seba, recently got together to discuss the 5 obstacles that keep most writer from earning a good living from their writing.

Inside this free video, you’ll learn about the 5 obstacles that keep most writers from earning a full-time living from their skills. If you ever procrastinate, doubt your skills or just aren’t sure how you can get started, this is for you.
To receive free instant accessjust click here to get started.

Time Management Tips for Writers

Some authors write a lot faster than others. Lucky them. But many authors get writer’s block and stress over their work. Still other struggle to meet their deadlines.

Time management can help solve these issues. Here are some tips to make the most of each day.

1. Set a Schedule

Try to write at the same time every day, a couple of times a day, if you are juggling it with a day job and other activities.

2. Use a Timer

Set an egg timer or an online timer for 25 minutes. Don’t do anything but write. Take a 5-minute break, then give yourself another 25 minutes. Continue in this manner for each writing session.

3. Set a Goal for Each Session

Decide what you want to work on and focus on that. You might be writing additional words for your novel, for example, or editing what you wrote recently.

4. Have Your Own Writing Area

Even if it is just one corner of your kitchen where you have your laptop, pens and paper, have a little office space for yourself that no one will tamper with.

5. Turn Off Distractions

Turn off the phone, stop your email from pinging and make sure your work space is relatively quiet. Avoid looking out of the window or tidying your desk when you are supposed to be writing.

6. Use To-Do Lists

To-do lists keep you on track and remove the stress of trying to remember everything that needs to be done. There is also immense satisfaction in tackling the task and then crossing it off your list.

7. Get Up Early to Write, or Write Late at Night

When the family are all still in bed can be the best time to get writing done. It can mean some sacrifices, but they can be worth it if you are creating a saleable piece of work.

8. Don’t Wait to Be in the Mood to Write

Writing is not so much about talent as work and consistency. Write every day even when you don’t feel like it. Treat it as part of your daily routine, like showering and brushing your teeth.

9. Broaden Your Definition of Writing

There’s always something to do when you are a writer, such as editing, research and so on. Use each scheduled session to the full even if you never write an original word.

10. Tackle the Tough Stuff First

If you struggle with a particular task, do it first to get it out of the way so you won’t dread doing it while you are working on your other writing-related tasks.

11. Don’t Believe in the Myth of Multitasking

There is really no such thing as multitasking. It is simply the brain switching back and forth rapidly between two tasks. The result? More stress for you, and each chore taking more than twice as long compared with working on each thing one at a time.

12. Outsource the Non-Essentials

If you hate doing a task, don’t do it well, and/or it does not have a direct impact on your writing or financial success, then outsource it and hire a freelancer to deal with it. Head over to Fiverr.com, get a lawn service, and so on.

Do This Next, If You Want to Make a Better Living from Writing

WriterHelpWanted.com and EliteWritersLab.com co-founders, Ron Douglas and Alice Seba, recently got together to discuss the 5 obstacles that keep most writer from earning a good living from their writing.

Inside this free video, you’ll learn about the 5 obstacles that keep most writers from earning a full-time living from their skills. If you ever procrastinate, doubt your skills or just aren’t sure how you can get started, this is for you.
To receive free instant accessjust click here to get started.

Traditional Publishing versus Self-Publishing

Many new writers agonize over whether to try the traditional publishing route or opt for self-publishing. Here are four factors to consider to help you decide.

1. Is it fiction or non-fiction?

2. Does it require a lot of images?

3. What genre of fiction is it?

If it is comics, manga or anime, print might be the best option.

4. Is there a traditional publishing house that regularly prints your type of work?

If you write romance, for example, there are a range of choices. Each of these traditional houses has a publishing program with “slots” that need to be filled. They also offer the advantage of marketing your book and getting it into stores as well as making it available online.

The Traditional Process

In traditional publishing, the author gets an idea for their book and either finishes it, or sends a query letter to see if the publishing house would be interested in it. They might send the letter themselves, or with the help of a literary agent, who will take a commission for the sales of the book.

Once the query letter or manuscript gets to the publishing house, an acquisitions editor reads it and decides whether or not it is a good fit for their list. This does not always have anything to do with how good the book is but rather, how well they think it will sell.

If they accept the book, the publisher buys the rights from the writer. The terms will vary from loose to very strict. They will pay the author an advance on future royalties. The royalty terms should be clearly specified.

The publisher then arranges for the printing, design, cover, manufacture, distribution, and marketing of the book. The advance may be generous or not. For a typical royalty, expect to earn about 35 cents per book sold.

The Self-Publishing Process

With self-publishing on the other hand, especially through the Kindle program at Amazon, you are in control. Upload your Word document and cover, set your price, and your book can be up and selling within a couple of days. You set the price. Price your book at $2.99 and at 70% royalty, you would get around $2 per book.

You retain your rights to your work and Amazon will help with some of the marketing. You will have to do your own editing and get a cover, but you can hire a professional on Fiverr.com. If you want to create a paperback of the book, to be sold via Amazon as a print on demand title (that is, one book published each time there is an order), you can do this using the same Word file through Amazon’s printing division CreateSpace.

The key issue is how much time you have to market your book. You will be taking on a lot of the chores of a traditional publisher. Having said that, the most successful authors with traditional publishers are those who are willing to market themselves at book signings, conferences and so on.

Determine your skills, time and interest, and how much money you want and control over your book, and then choose which publishing option is right for you.

Do This Next, If You Want to Make a Better Living from Writing

WriterHelpWanted.com and EliteWritersLab.com co-founders, Ron Douglas and Alice Seba, recently got together to discuss the 5 obstacles that keep most writer from earning a good living from their writing.

Inside this free video, you’ll learn about the 5 obstacles that keep most writers from earning a full-time living from their skills. If you ever procrastinate, doubt your skills or just aren’t sure how you can get started, this is for you.
To receive free instant accessjust click here to get started.

It’s Not Just about the Writing When It Comes to Fiction

Whenever a fiction writer decides to self-publish their work, they can be so excited at the prospect that they slip up on some of the most basic details. These details can make all the difference between success and failure. Here’s a checklist of essentials which go beyond the mere writing and contribute to the bestseller status of a book.

1. The Cover

People really DO judge a book by its cover. It has to be as good as anything you would see on a store shelf, or side by side with your book on Amazon. Don’t skimp. Unless you are a professional artist and book designer, hire a pro on Fiverr.com. Check out their portfolios to make sure their style is in line with your vision of what your cover should look like. Discuss your ideas, and make sure your contract allows for revisions.

2. The Proofreading 

The book should be as error free as possible. Make sure you have at least one person other than yourself read over a printed copy of the book, not just a digital one. Word’s spelling and grammar checker are useful, but not perfect.

3. The Editing

It can be tough to judge your own novel, especially if you have been slaving away over it for months. A professional editor, or a friend who loves to read, can make sure you have a powerful beginning and ending. They can also look for inner logic in the novel, such as characters, situations and settings. You would be amazed at how many characters’ eyes start out brown and end up green by the end of the book!

4. The Marketing Copy of the Book

There are two forms of marketing copy that will appear on or in the book:

* The “Blurb”
* The teaser copy

The “blurb” goes on the back of the book and sometimes on the first page inside the book as well. It is like a summary of the story and should entice people to read it.

The teaser copy can be on the back as well, and/or on the first page inside the book. It should be a dramatic excerpt from the novel that draws the potential reader into the story.

5. The Marketing Copy for the Book

A lot of different marketing copy can surround the book. For example, the blurb and teaser will appear online in most cases. You might even include them in a promotional package to a book reviewer. Once the reviews start to come in, if they are good, you can quote from them to help market your book.

If you know any prominent authors or agents who might be kind enough to take a first look and write a comment or two, or even a foreword, this would also be incredibly useful for selling more books.

6. A Great Author Biography, Website/Blog, and Social Media Presence

Readers love to feel they “know” authors and that they are accessible, not hiding in a cave writing all the time. In order to convey that you are a real person, write a great biography, include a professional headshot to use as a promotional photo anywhere you need one, and create a great website or blog to showcase your work.

Have a page at all of the most important social media sites and interact with fans regularly, and you should have no trouble making sales.

Do This Next, If You Want to Make a Better Living from Writing

WriterHelpWanted.com and EliteWritersLab.com co-founders, Ron Douglas and Alice Seba, recently got together to discuss the 5 obstacles that keep most writer from earning a good living from their writing.

Inside this free video, you’ll learn about the 5 obstacles that keep most writers from earning a full-time living from their skills. If you ever procrastinate, doubt your skills or just aren’t sure how you can get started, this is for you.
To receive free instant accessjust click here to get started.

12 Fiction Marketing Tips

There are a number of ways to market fiction effectively. Here are some of the top ways to sell well:

1. A Great Cover

People really DO judge a book by its cover, so make sure yours is as good as anything you would see on a store shelf. Hire a freelancer at Fiverr.com to turn your vision of your cover into a work of art.

2. A Great Blurb and Teaser Copy

The “blurb” is what goes on the back of the book. The teaser copy can be on the back as well, or on the first page inside the book (you can put the blurb there too). These pieces of content are both designed to encourage the browser to read more.

3. A Great Author Website and Webpage

Be proud of your work and showcase it on your site. Also make it a place where you are accessible, and interact with people through comments, questions and so on.

4. See Yourself as a Brand

Brands like Coke, Nike and McDonald’s all have a unified marketing plan, in which every ad or other material build on the brand’s image and reputation. In a similar way, see your author name (or pen name) as a brand you wish to present in a certain way, and don’t want to damage or dilute.

If you want to write a different genre, create a different pen name and website or blog for it. For example, writer Nora Roberts is a brand synonymous with romance, and J. D. Robb, her second pen name, is synonymous with mystery and suspense.

5. Give Interviews

People always wonder what it is like to be a writer. Give interviews and post them at your site.

6. Attend Publishing Conferences and Writing Groups in Your Genre and Geographical Area

People do business with people they like. Attending live events and networking with publishing professionals, other authors, and aspiring authors, can lead to all sorts of promotional opportunities. It also makes you more visible and shows you are someone who cares about your craft.

7. Be Charitable

Giving things away may seem an odd way to make money, but “giving back” to new writers or donating your profits to a worthy cause can create a lot of goodwill and show you are a good person, not just a “greedy author”.

8. Join Writer-Related Organizations

Romance Writers of America, The Author’s Guild and so on can all help raise your profile.

9. Leverage Social Media

Have a social media account for your writing at all of the top social sites, such as:

* Facebook
* Twitter
* LinkedIn
* Pinterest
* Tumblr
* YouTube
* Instagram

Keep fans up to date on all your news.

9. Create a Facebook Contest

Contests are a great way to grab attention.

10. Give a Webinar

Host a webinar about how to become a better writer, and give attendees a special discount on your books. You can do this through PayPal or create a store for yourself at a site like Gumroad.

11. Get Book Reviews

As soon as your book is done, start gathering reviews for it. They can really make a difference when it comes to sales.

12. Organize Book Signings

If you have a paper book, organize book signings at bookstores, your local libraries and so on.

Follow these marketing tips and see your sales increase as a result.

Do This Next, If You Want to Make a Better Living from Writing

WriterHelpWanted.com and EliteWritersLab.com co-founders, Ron Douglas and Alice Seba, recently got together to discuss the 5 obstacles that keep most writer from earning a good living from their writing.

Inside this free video, you’ll learn about the 5 obstacles that keep most writers from earning a full-time living from their skills. If you ever procrastinate, doubt your skills or just aren’t sure how you can get started, this is for you.
To receive free instant accessjust click here to get started.

Fiction Writing Basics

There are several basic rules when it comes to writing fiction.

1. Character Is Key

You need to have a main character that readers can identify with. They don’t have to be perfect. To make them interesting, they do need to have some issues to work through in the course of the novel.

2. Outline Your Plot

Write an outline of what is going to happen in the beginning, middle and end of the book. This will give the characters some direction in your novel. It’s okay to change things if your characters or situations in the book take on a life of their own, but have a general idea of the point of the story.

3. Start in the Middle of Things

“In media res” is a common literary term. It is Latin for “into the middle of things”. It helps get the novel off to an active start. Then you can fill in the back story as you go along.

4. Choose a Point of View That Makes the Most Sense for Your Novel

Some write in the first person (“I”), while others use the third person (“he” or “she”). The narrator can be limited or omniscient (all knowing), giving us information about what is going on with other characters in the book. A third person-limited narrator might not know the whole story, but this can be a good thing for certain genres, such as mystery or horror, with the story unfolding for us as it does for the main protagonist.

5. Use Dialogue to Move the Character and Story Along and Fill In the Back Story

Dialogue can do a lot of the heavy lifting when it comes to drawing a character, advancing plot, suspense, tension and so on. The conversation between characters can also give us a sense of their past and make them more well-rounded and three-dimensional.

6. Show, Don’t Tell

Here we are referring to descriptions of people, places, and emotions, not to dialogue. When you are showing, you are giving details that all add up to the reader drawing a conclusion about what they are reading.

For example, if you describe a person as, “scowling, fists clenched, panting with fury”, you won’t need to say, “He was angry”. If you say, “The snow was thawing and the first daffodils were just starting to peep through the ground as Amy hurried home to get ready for her Valentine’s date”, there is no need to tell us it’s February in the northern hemisphere.

7. Give the Characters Motives

What drives your characters to do what they do? Even a villain will have some reason. Motiveless evil gets pretty dull after a while.

8. Engage the Emotions

Feel the emotion as you write and your readers should feel it as they read. Don’t make it all about plot. Make the characters real people with believable feelings and reasons for all they do.

9. Write What You Know

Don’t make your character a rocket scientist if you flunked science. Don’t write about a painful divorce if you are happily married with three kids, unless you have a friend who is spilling her guts to you every night on the phone about the terrible time she is having.

10. Revise Carefully

Try to make your work as error-free as possible.

Use these tips to ensure that your writing is as good as it can be. Perhaps your novel will become the next bestseller!

Do This Next, If You Want to Make a Better Living from Writing

WriterHelpWanted.com and EliteWritersLab.com co-founders, Ron Douglas and Alice Seba, recently got together to discuss the 5 obstacles that keep most writer from earning a good living from their writing.

Inside this free video, you’ll learn about the 5 obstacles that keep most writers from earning a full-time living from their skills. If you ever procrastinate, doubt your skills or just aren’t sure how you can get started, this is for you.
To receive free instant accessjust click here to get started.